#ThrowbackThursday - Everton v Chelsea: Part Three - 1984 to 2000

(Part One covering 1907 to 1964 can be found here, while Part Two covering 1964 to 1979 can be found here).

 

On Chelsea’s return to top flight Football in 1984/85, their first meeting with Everton came on a Friday evening in late August, three games in at Stamford Bridge.  Chelsea’s first two games had been a 1-1 draw away at Arsenal in the opening day and a 1-0 home win over Sunderland.  The game would be Chelsea’s first live top flight League appearance caught on Television, as the game would feature on the BBC’s ‘Match of the Day’ live.  A goal from Kevin Richardson gave Everton a 1-0 win     

By the time of the return fixture three days before Christmas 1984.  Everton topped the table, one point ahead of Spurs in second.  After a 2-4 away defeat to Norwich, followed by two draws at home to Sheffield Wednesday and away to QPR, the Toffees got back to winning ways a week earlier with a 5-0 home win over Brian Clough’s Nottingham Forest.  Chelsea meanwhile were sixth.  On nine minutes, Gordon Davies gave Chelsea the lead after Kerry Dixon pounced on a mistake by John Bailey.  Paul Bracewell equalised for Everton ten minutes before half time after getting on the end of an Andy Gray cross.  Gordon Davies however restored Chelsea’s lead five minutes later after an assist from Mickey Thomas.  Just after the hour mark, Colin Pates put Chelsea 3-1 up after a Chelsea counter attack as Everton pushed for an equaliser.

 

With just over twenty minutes left, Graeme Sharp would pull one back for Everton from the penalty spot after Joe McLaughlin brought down Andy Gray in the box.  Gordon Davies however bagged a hat-trick with fourteen minutes left to go for Chelsea’s fourth, set up by an in form Pat Nevin.  With two minutes to go, Graeme Sharp bagged his second from the penalty spot after a Joe McLaughlin handball in the box, though couldn’t prevent a 4-3 victory for Chelsea – their first over Everton for nine and half years.  As a result of that defeat, Everton were leapfrogged by both Man United in second and Spurs at the top of the table.  After this defeat however, the Toffees embarked on an eighteen game unbeaten run (with sixteen victories) to take the League title.  Chelsea meanwhile finished the season in sixth place.

     

In 1985/86, Everton came to Stamford Bridge in mid-October.  The game was lost to TV black out during the first half of the season.  Both sides had won six of their first eleven games, with Chelsea third and Everton fourth in the table.  Goals for Kerry Dixon and David Speedie gave Chelsea a 2-1 win, while Kevin Sheedy was on target for Everton.  The two sides were they drawn against each other in the fourth round of the League Cup at Stamford Bridge and played out a 2-2 draw.  Kerry Dixon and Pat Nevin were on target for Chelsea, while Paul Bracewell and Kevin Sheedy were on target for Everton.

The replay took place two weeks later at Goodison Park.  Goals for Kerry Dixon and Joe McLaughlin gave Chelsea a 2-1 victory, while Gary Lineker was on target for the Toffees.  Four months later, Chelsea returned to Goodison Park in the League in mid-March 1986.  The game would be shown live on ITV’s ‘The Big Match Live’.  Everton topped the table with a five point margin over Liverpool in second, with a game in hand over their Merseyside rivals.  Chelsea meanwhile were eight points behind Everton, but with three games in hand.  Chelsea turned out in an unfamiliar plain red away kit.

        

Chelsea took the lead with a goal from Jerry Murphy after twelve minutes.  An equaliser from Kevin Sheedy with four minutes to go earned a 1-1 draw.  Everton finished the season two points behind Champions Liverpool in second place.  Meanwhile Chelsea who moved to within six points from the top of the table with five games to go, could manage just one point from a possible fifteen in the run in to drop to a sixth place finish. 

In 1986/87, Chelsea came to Goodison Park in early November.  At the time, Everton had lost four of their last six games and had sunk from second in the table in September to sixth place.  Chelsea however with just three wins from their first thirteen games had sunk to twentieth place.  The match ended in a 2-2 draw, with Trevor Steven and Kevin Sheedy on target for Everton, while Colin Pates and Keith Jones were in target for Chelsea.  The return fixture at Stamford Bridge occurred in early April 1987.  Everton were second in the table, three points behind league leaders Liverpool but with two games in hand over their rivals.  Chelsea meanwhile rose up to eleventh on the back of four straight victories.

   

Everton took the lead with a Chelsea own goal.  Kerry Dixon equalised for Chelsea, however Everton secured three points with a brilliant thirty yard strike from Alan Harper.  With Liverpool occupied in the League Cup Final with Arsenal the following day, the result pushed Everton up to the top of the table on goal difference with a game in hand.  Everton secured their ninth title a month later with a nine point margin over Liverpool in second place, however Howard Kendall left Goodison Park over the summer.  Chelsea meanwhile finished the season in lowly fourteenth position.

In 1987/88, Chelsea came to Goodison Park in mid-October.  Chelsea had won six of their first ten game and stood in fourth place.  Everton now had Colin Harvey in charge and stood in ninth position with just four wins from ten games.  The Toffees got their season back on track with a 4-1 win over Chelsea with two goals apiece for Adrian Heath and Graeme Sharp, while Kerry Dixon would be on target for the Blues.  By the time of Chelsea’s trip to Goodison Park in mid-March 1988, the Blues had failed to win a league game in sixteen matches, with Chelsea dropping to sixteenth in the table.  John Hollins had been sacked by Chelsea and replaced by Bobby Campbell earlier in the week.  Reigning champions Everton meanwhile were fourth in the table, though twenty points behind league leaders Liverpool.  The game ended in a goalless draw. 

Everton finished the season fourth in the table, meanwhile Chelsea after a 1-1 draw with Charlton finished fourth from bottom and hence sucked into a play-off with three second tier sides to retain their place in the top tier.  The Blues were relegated after losing to Middlesbrough 2-1 on aggregate.  Chelsea were the only side to have been relegated from the top flight since the introduction of the play offs in 1986/87, before the format was changed the following year to involve just sides from the same division, partly due to the crowd trouble which followed Chelsea’s relegation in the second leg at Stamford Bridge.  

Chelsea came back up to the top tier as Champions of the old Second Division in 1988/89.  Their first meeting with Everton came in mid-November 1989.  After eleven games, both sides had a good start to the 1989/90 season with Everton standing second, while Chelsea were third.  A goal for Steve Clarke gave Everton a 1-0 victory.  The result took Chelsea to the top of the table after Liverpool lost 0-1 to Coventry. 

Everton meanwhile came to Stamford Bridge for the return fixture in late April 1990, with two games left to play.  By this point, Everton were fourth but twelve points behind league leaders Liverpool.  Chelsea stood four points behind Everton in sixth place.  Two Kerry Dixon goals earned Chelsea a 2-1 win, meanwhile former Blues star Pat Nevin was on target for Everton.  Chelsea finished the season in fifth place, while Everton ended 1989/90 in sixth.

The next meeting between the two sides occurred on New Years’ Day 1991 at Stamford Bridge.  By this point, Everton had sacked Colin Harvey and brought back Howard Kendall after his brief spell at Man City after returning from Athletic Bilboa.  Chelsea were eighth in the League, while Everton were fourteenth.  Chelsea took the lead with a goal from Kevin Wilson.  Everton equalised with a header from Graeme Sharp, while an own goal from Jason Cundy gave Everton a 2-1 win.

The return fixture for 1990/91 came in mid-April.  Everton stood in eleventh place, while Chelsea were thirteenth.  Everton took a two goal lead with Tony Cottee and John Ebbrell on target.  However two goals from Kerry Dixon earned Chelsea a 2-2 draw.  Everton finished 1990/91 in ninth place, while Chelsea finished eleventh.

In 1991/92, Everton came to Stamford Bridge in late September after ten games played.  Chelsea were fifth in the table at the time, while Everton were fourteenth.  Everton took the lead with a goal from John Ebbrell.  Kevin Wilson equalised for Chelsea, before a Dennis Wise header gave the Blues the lead.  Everton however earned a point after Peter Beardsley pounced on a defensive error by Chelsea’s Ken Monkou for a 2-2 draw.  

The two sides would meet again in the fourth round of the FA Cup.  A goal from Clive Allen on the volley gave Chelsea a 1-0 victory.  Kevin Hitchcock conceded a penalty after bringing down Everton’s Peter Beagrie in the box.  Hitchcock however saved the resulting penalty from Tony Cottee.  Chelsea that season progressed as far as the Quarter Finals before losing to that year’s runners up second tier Sunderland.

The return League fixture at Goodison Park came on the final Saturday of the season and would be the last fixture that either side would play within the Football League.  Chelsea stood eleventh, but could climb no higher.  Everton meanwhile stood just three points behind, but five positions beneath in sixteenth.  Chelsea’s Ken Monkou conceded a penalty after hitting out at Peter Beardsley, who who successfully converted the resulting penalty.  In the second half, Peter Beagrie doubled Everton’s lead followed by his trade mark somersault celebration.  Chelsea pulled a goal back from Eddie Newton on the half volley just outside the area, but couldn’t prevent a 2-1 victory for Everton which moved the Toffees up to twelfth, while Chelsea sunk to fourteenth.

The first meeting between the two sides during the Premiership era occurred in late November 1992 at Goodison Park.  After fifteen games, Chelsea were eighth while Everton with just four wins were languishing in seventeenth place.  A goal from Robert Fleck just ahead of half time gave Chelsea a 1-0 win

Eleven days later, Chelsea returned to Goodison Park in the fourth round of the League Cup, in front of a crowd of just 14,457 spectators.  The two sides played out a 2-2 draw with Peter Beardsley and Stuart Barlow on target for Everton, while Mick Harford and Graham Stuart were on the scoresheet for Chelsea, meaning that the tie went to a replay back at Stamford Bridge a fortnight later.  Nine days before Christmas, a goal from Andy Townsend gave Chelsea a 1-0 win to put the Blues into the Quarter Final.  The Blues however would be eliminated the following month with a defeat to London rivals Crystal Palace.

The return fixture in the League came in early March 1993 at Stamford Bridge.  By this time, Bobby Campbell had left Chelsea and was to be replaced by David Webb until the end of the season.  At the time, neither were doing too well in the Premiership.  Chelsea were thirteenth while Everton were sixteenth in the table.  Graham Stuart gave Chelsea the lead six minutes before half time.  Just ahead of the break however Billy Kenny equalised for Everton.  With eleven minutes to go, a goal from substitute John Spencer gave Chelsea a 2-1 victory.  Chelsea finished the season eleventh, while Everton ended their first Premiership term in thirteenth place.

It would be another ten months before the two sides met again, when Everton returned to Stamford Bridge in early January 1994.  By this time, Glenn Hoddle had been appointed Chelsea manager, while Everton had parted company with Howard Kendall and had Jimmy Gabriel standing in as caretaker manager.  Everton were sixteenth in the table, while Chelsea were four points behind in seventeenth.  Chelsea went into half time two goals up with Craig Burley on target with a thirty yard strike and a penalty from Mark Stein.  Within the first ten minutes of the second half, goals for Tony Cottee and Stuart Barlow pulled it back to two each.  Goals for Neil Shipperley and another from Mark Stein however ensured a 4-2 victory for Chelsea. 

The return fixture at Goodison was just under one month on, by which point Everton had appointed former Norwich manager Mike Walker as boss.  John Ebbrell gave Everton the lead after just four minutes.  Nineteen minutes later, Mark Stein equalised for Chelsea.  Ahead of half time though two goals for Paul Rideout put Everton 3-1 up.  Brett Angel gave the Toffees their fourth goal.  Two minutes from time, Mark Stein successfully converted a penalty, however couldn’t prevent a 4-2 victory for Everton.  Chelsea finished the season in fourteenth, while Everton escaped the drop with a 3-2 win over Wimbledon on the final day of the season, to finish in seventeenth place.

In 1994/95, Everton came to Stamford Bridge in late November.  Everton were only kept off the bottom of the table by one point over Ipswich Town.  Manager Joe Royle had just taken over and enjoyed a 2-0 victory over Liverpool five days earlier.  Chelsea meanwhile were sixth.  A goal for Paul Rideout gave Everton a 1-0 victory.

The return fixture back at Stamford Bridge came in early May.  Everton were just two points above the relegation zone in seventeenth place, though with their FA Cup Final date in seventeen days’ time, Everton had two games in hand over in Norwich City in twentieth place.  Chelsea meanwhile were in twelfth place.  Paul Furlong gave Chelsea the lead on the half hour with a flying header, before Andy Hinchcliffe equalised nine minutes later.  Five minutes into the second half, Gary Ablett put Everton into the lead, before David Hopkin equalised within a minute.  With twenty minutes to go, Nigerian Daniel Amokachi restored Everton’s lea, before Paul Furlong bagged his second to draw Chelsea level again.  With no further scoring, the match ended in a 3-3 draw.  Everton finished the season with a five point cushion from safety in fifteenth as well as winning the FA Cup, while Chelsea finished in eleventh place.

Everton travelled to Stamford Bridge for the opening game of the 1995/96 season.  The game ended in a 0-0 draw, with former Arsenal star Anders Limpar going close by hitting the post.  Chelsea’s trip to Goodison Park came in Mid-January.  By this point, Everton were ninth in the table, while Chelsea were twelfth.  John Spencer gave Chelsea the lead on twenty minutes, while a David Unsworth penalty ten minutes ahead of half time earned Everton a 1-1 draw.  The Toffees finished the season in sixth place, while Chelsea ended 1995/96 eleventh.

Glenn Hoddle was appointed England manager after Terry Venables’s exit after Euro ’96.  The Blues went on to appoint Dutchman Ruud Gullit as Player Manager.  His first meeting with Everton came in early December 1996 at Stamford Bridge.  One point separated the two teams, with Chelsea in seventh and Everton in eighth.  Chelsea took the lead with a goal from Gianfranco Zola on twelve minutes, before Michael Branch equalised five minutes later.  Just before the half hour, Andrei Kanchelskis put Everton ahead.  Ten minutes into the second half, a goal from Gianluca Vialli pulled Chelsea level.  With no further scoring, the game ended in a 2-2 draw.

The return fixture at Goodison Park came on the final day of the 1996/97 season in May.  Chelsea were in sixth place, but one week away from their FA Cup Final date with Middlesbrough at Wembley.  Everton meanwhile were fifteenth, but a four point cushion from the relegation zone ensured their survival.  The Toffees had parted company with Joe Royle and had Dave Watson acting as caretaker boss until the end of the season.  Goals for Dennis Wise and Roberto Di Matteo put Chelsea two goals up by half time.  In the second half, Nick Barmby pulled one back for Everton with thirteen minutes to go, but with no further scoring it was not enough to prevent a 2-1 win for Chelsea.  The Blues also went on to win their first trophy in twenty six years with the FA Cup one week later.   

In 1997/98, Everton came to Stamford Bridge at the end of November.  The Toffees had reappointed Howard Kendall as Everton boss for the third time.  Despite this, the Blues were anchored to the foot of the Premiership.  Chelsea meanwhile were fifth in the table.  Two penalties in the last minute from Dennis Wise ten minutes from time and Gianfranco Zola in the last minute (the latter infringement saw a red card for Slaven Billic) earned Chelsea a 2-0 win.

Eight weeks later, Chelsea came to Goodison Park for the return fixture in third place and seven points off of Premiership leaders Man United.  Everton meanwhile had risen to sixteenth, but were still only two points from the foot of the Premiership table.  Ruud Gullit had upset Everton boss Kendall with some derogatory comments about Everton’s football following Everton’s previous defeat in November, Kendall however was to get his revenge.  Tore Andre Flo gave Chelsea the lead eight minutes from half time.  Two minutes later however Gary Speed equalised for Everton.  Just past the hour mark, Duncan Ferguson gave Everton the lead with a header from a corner and a Michael Duberry own goal seven minutes from time gave Everton a 3-1 victory. 

Chelsea went on to fire Ruud Gullit in early February, though ended the season in fourth place, as well as picking up two trophies in the League Cup and European Cup Winners Cup.  Everton meanwhile kept their place in the Premiership by virtue of a better goal difference than eighteenth place Bolton Wanderers, who Chelsea beat 2-0 on the last day of the season.

Over the summer, Everton hired former Rangers boss Walter Smith in place of Howard Kendall.  The first meeting between Smith and Vialli took place in early December 1998 at Goodison Park.  Chelsea were in fifth place and five points off of Premiership leaders Aston Villa.  Everton meanwhile had only won four of their fifteen Premiership matches played so far.  The two sides played out a goalless draw.  The return fixture at Stamford Bridge came at the beginning of May 1999 with just four games left to go.

 

Chelsea were third and just four points behind Premiership leaders Arsenal.  Everton were fifteenth, but with an eight point cushion from the relegation zone.  Gianfranco Zola gave Chelsea the lead midway through the first half.  Dan Petrescu doubled Chelsea’s lead on the hour.  Nine minutes later, Francis Jeffers pulled one back for Everton, while another for Zola nine minutes from time meant a 3-1 victory for Chelsea.    

The last meeting between the two sides during the twentieth century came in late November 1999 at Goodison Park.  Chelsea at the time stood in ninth place, while Everton were one point behind in tenth though having played two games more.  Everton took the lead with a goal from Kevin Campbell.  A last minute equaliser however from Tore Andre Flo earned Chelsea a point with a 1-1 draw.

The first meeting between the two sides of the new millennium came in early March 2000 at Stamford Bridge.  Chelsea stood third in the table and nine points off of Premiership leaders Man United.  Everton meanwhile were nine points behind in seventh place.  Dennis Wise gave Chelsea a first half lead on the half hour with a goal from Dennis Wise.  A goal from Danny Cadermarteri twenty one minutes from time however earned Everton a 1-1 draw.

As will be seen tomorrow in Part Four, despite a brief relative decline after the millennium, Chelsea entered a golden period after the introduction of Russian oligarch benefactor Roman Abramovich in the summer of 2003.

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*Published 25th August 2017