After the trauma of Hillsborough and losing the title on the final day of the 1988/89 season, in 1989/90 Liverpool met Everton seven games into the season in September.  It would be the final fixture between the two sides during the 1980s.  Everton topped the table with four wins from their first six games and unbeaten since losing the first game of the season.  Liverpool stood in second place, unbeaten though having drawn three of their first six games.  New signing Mike Newell – who Liverpool released as a youngster – gave Everton the lead on eighteen minutes.  Fifteen minutes later however, Ian Rush continued to be the scourge of Everton fans by equalising for Liverpool.  Just past the hour mark and Rush struck again to put Liverpool in front.  Two minutes later, John Barnes added another to give Liverpool a 3-1 victory and leapfrog their neighbours across Stanley Park to the top of the table, while Everton dropped to fifth place.

The return fixture and first Merseyside Derby of the 1990s came the following February.  Liverpool topped the old First Division with a superior goal difference over second place Aston Villa.  Graham Taylor’s side however had a game in hand.  John Barnes put Liverpool ahead after ten minutes, with Peter Beardsley doubling their lead on the half hour from the penalty spot.  Just ahead of half time, Graham Sharp pulled one back for Everton, however Liverpool ran out 2-1 winners. 

Liverpool remained at the top of the table, which back then was nothing out of the ordinary.  The following weekend however saw the twin sensations of Mike Tyson losing his undisputed World Heavyweight title to rank outsider Buster Douglas, followed later that same day by the release of Nelson Mandela after twenty seven years imprisonment in South Africa.  Both of these examples showed that the times were changing and that the new decade challenged the old certainties.  The Football World as it turned out was no different.  Liverpool secured their eighteenth league title by the end of April 1990.  To date it was their last title.  Everton in contrast finished sixth.  English clubs returned to European football the following season, though Liverpool received an additional season exiled from European competition, as punishment for their fans’ involvement in the Heysel disaster.

In their defence of the title in 1990/91, Liverpool came to Goodison Park as defending Champions for the last time in September.  After five games, there had been little to suggest that Anfield hegemony was coming to an end as Liverpool took maximum points – including a 4-0 home thrashing of Man United on Live television.  Everton’s season in stark contrast saw the Toffees yet to clock up their first victory, losing their first three games of the season followed by two draws.  Frustrations at Goodison Park were shown by Neville Southall’s refusal to go back to the dressing room at half time after Everton found themselves three goals down to newly promoted Leeds United on the opening day. 

Goals for Peter Beardsley and a John Barnes penalty put Liverpool two goals up by half time.  Into the second half, with twenty two minutes to go Peter Beardsley added his second and Liverpool’s third.  Everton staged a comeback of sorts with Andy Hinchcliffe and Stuart McCall pulling two goal back, however the Toffees were unable to prevent a 3-2 victory for Liverpool. 

That game turned out to be the final Merseyside Derby of the Colin Harvey era as Everton boss, after Harvey had been sacked at the end of October 1990 with just one win from their first ten games and languishing in eighteenth position.  Former boss Howard Kendall returned to Goodison Park to take back the reins over the Everton side.  The first Merseyside Derby after Kendall’s return came in early February at Anfield.  Liverpool were kept off of the top spot by Arsenal on the basis of the Gunners having a superior goal difference.  Liverpool took the lead with a goal from Jan Molby on seventeen minutes.  Just ahead of half time, Pat Nevin equalised for Everton.  Within the first ten minutes of the second half however, new signing David Speedie bagged two goals to secure a 3-1 win for the Reds. 

#FlashbackFriday - Liverpool v Everton:  Part Four - 1989 to 2017

(Part One covering 1895 to 1915 can be found here, Part two covering 1919 to 1955 here and Part Three covering 1962 to 1989 here)

The following week, the two sides met again in the fifth round of the FA Cup.  The game would be captured live by the BBC’s ‘Match of the Day’.  The two sides played out a 0-0 draw and faced a replay back at Goodison Park three days later.  The game would be the very first Merseyside Derby to be shown on Satellite Television.  The previous October, British Satellite Broadcasting had merged with Rupert Murdoch’s Sky Television Network to form BSkyB.  The game was shown on what was then simply known as ‘The Sports Network’, which was part of the BSB five channel package until a couple of months later it would be rebranded as Sky Sports.  This would be an early example of the commentary box team up of Martin Tyler and former Toffee Andy Gray.

   

Kenny Dalglish had been under fire in some quarters for dropping Peter Beardsley from the Liverpool side just before Christmas.  It was Beardsley who put Liverpool ahead eight minutes before half time.  Graham Sharp pulled Everton level three minutes into the second half.  Beardsley restored Liverpool’s lead with nineteen minutes left to go, before Graham Sharp equalised again to make it two each two minutes later.  Ian Rush put Liverpool 3-2 up with thirteen minutes to go, with Everton looking like they were on their way to the Quarter Finals.  With four minutes to go, Kendall decided to give a run out to substitute Tony Cottee who equalised in the last minute.

Into extra time, John Barnes put Liverpool into a 4-3 lead.  Tony Cottee however equalised again seven minutes from time, with the game ending in a 4-4 draw.  This incidentally would be the very last FA Cup tie to go beyond a second game, as the following season the FA would reformat the competition to include a penalty shoot-out should the sides still be equal after extra time during the second game.   

Within forty eight hours of this fixture, Kenny Dalglish would shock the football world by handing in his resignation to the Liverpool board, citing that the stress of the job had taken its toll on him.  It would later transpire that his resignation would be a delayed reaction to the Hillsborough disaster (remembering of course that Hillsborough was the third such football tragedy which Kenny was unfortunate to be present at – along with Heysel in 1985 and the Ibrox Disaster back in his Celtic days in 1971).  The fallout from Kenny’s resignation can be seen from this episode of ITV’s ‘Saint & Greavsie’ Saturday lunch time magazine show.

Kenny’s resignation disrupted Liverpool’s form, with a defeat to Luton Town on the plastic pitch at Kennilworth Road the following Saturday.  The second replay followed four days later back at Goodison Park.  A goal for Dave Watson meant a 1-0 win for Everton to eliminate Liverpool.  The Toffees however were eliminated in the next round with a defeat to second tier West Ham.  Liverpool finished the season with Graeme Souness taking over at the helm, though came runners up to an Arsenal side who lost just one game all season and a seven point cushion despite seeing two points deducted for a brawl with Man United at Old Trafford earlier in the season.  Everton meanwhile finished ninth.

The first Merseyside Derby of the Graeme Souness era came early on in the 1991/92 season, in August.  David Burrows opened the scoring in the first minute with a long range strike.  A second from Dean Saunders followed on fifteen minutes.  Ray Houghton added a third just past the hour.  A consolation goal for Mike Newell twelve minutes from time was not enough to prevent a 3-1 win for Liverpool.  

The very last Merseyside Derby of the pre-Premiership era came in the interim between Christmas and New Year in 1991 at Goodison Park.  By this point, Liverpool were in fifth place but thirteen points off of League leaders Man United.  Everton meanwhile stood in ninth position.  Four minutes before half time, Nick Tanner put Liverpool ahead with his first goal for the Reds.  An equaliser for Maurice Johnston just past the hour however gave Everton a 1-1 draw.  Liverpool finished their final season in the Football League in sixth place.  Everton meanwhile finished in twelfth place.

The very first Merseyside Derby of the Premiership era followed nearly twelve months later at Goodison Park in December 1992.  The game would be covered live by Sky Sports’ ‘Monday Night Football’ show.  Liverpool stood as low as ninth position and fourteen points off of League leaders Norwich City.  Everton were even further down in the table in nineteenth place.  Central Defender Mark Wright gave Liverpool the lead, however goals for Maurice Johnston and six minutes from time a winner from Peter Beardsley (having now crossed Stanley Park to join the Toffees) meant a 2-1 victory for Everton.

The return fixture back at Anfield came in March 1993.  For the first time in many a year, both Merseyside clubs went into a Derby at this stage of the season languishing in the bottom half of the table.  Liverpool stood in fourteenth place and twenty points off of league leaders Norwich City.  Everton stood in seventeenth place though with a nine point cushion from the relegation zone.  A last minute goal for Israeli international Ronnie Rosenthal meant a 1-0 win for Liverpool. 

The Reds meanwhile finished the first ever Premiership season in sixth place, though twenty five points off of Champions Man United.  Everton finished in thirteenth place.  Liverpool’s next visit to Goodison Park came in September 1993.  After seven games, Liverpool stood in fifth while Everton were in eighth place.  Goals for two former West Ham players in Mark Ward and Tony Cottee gave Everton a 2-0 win which pushed them up to fourth place.  This Derby would be notable for a furious clash between Liverpool keeper Bruce Grobbelaar and a young Steve McManaman after Mark Ward’s opener.  This would be the final Merseyside Derby during the Graeme Souness era at Anfield and as well as Howard Kendall’s second spell at Goodison Park.

The Toffees however ended up winning just one further game before Christmas, which saw the end of Howard Kendall who was replaced by Norwich City’s Mike Walker in January 1994.  A defeat by Bristol City in the fourth round of the FA Cup also saw Graeme Souness resign as Liverpool boss and replaced by Anfield boot room member Roy Evans.  By the time of the next Merseyside Derby in March 1994, Liverpool stood in seventh place having lost three of their last four games.  Everton meanwhile were in fifteenth place.  Dave Watson gave Everton the lead, though goals for Ian Rush almost immediately from the Everton goal and a young Robbie Fowler gave Liverpool a 2-1 win.

For poor Mike Walker, that would be his one and only Merseyside Derby.  After finishing just two points off of relegation in 1993/94, needing to come back from two goals down to defeat Wimbledon with a minute goal to finish seventeenth, Walker would be dismissed as Everton boss at the start of November 1994 and replaced by former Everton forward Joe Royle two weeks later.  On the very day of his appointment came the visit of Liverpool to Goodison Park.  The Reds stood fourth in the table and five points off of Premiership leaders Man United, while Everton languished rock bottom of the table with just five wins from fourteen games.  Joe Royle’s reign got off to a flyer as goals for Duncan Ferguson and Paul Rideout meant a 2-0 win for the Toffees.

By the time of the return fixture at the end of January 1995, Liverpool stood third and eight points off of League leaders Blackburn Rovers.  Everton stood eighteenth and just one point above the relegation zone.  The two sides played out a 0-0 draw.  Liverpool finished the season in fourth place and fifteen points off of Champions Blackburn Rovers, who were now managed by Kenny Dalglish and secured the Premiership title at Anfield with a 2-2 draw on the final day.  Everton secured their Premiership status to finish fifteenth and five points off of the relegation zone.  Merseyside secured both domestic Cups that year however, with Liverpool winning the League Cup and Everton the FA Cup.

 

In 1995/96, the two Merseyside teams met Anfield in Mid-November.  Liverpool were fifth and six points behind league leaders Newcastle United, while Everton were thirteenth.  Two goals for Andrei Kanchelskis (who had signed from Man United after a fall out with Alex Ferguson over the summer) put Everton two goals up.  Robbie Fowler pulled one back for Liverpool in the dying minutes, but it was not enough to prevent a 2-1 win for Everton and their first win at Anfield for eight years. 

The return fixture at Goodison Park came the following April.  Liverpool now stood in third place, but eight points off of leaders Man United.  Everton meanwhile stood in seventh place.  Andrei Kanchelskis put Everton ahead after nineteen minutes.  However a Robbie Fowler equaliser three minutes from time earned Liverpool a 1-1 draw.  Liverpool and Everton finished third and sixth respectively in 1995/96, with Liverpool reaching that year’s FA Cup Final, but losing to Man United in the final who secured their second Double in three years in the process. 

By the following November, the two sides met again for the 1996/97 season at Goodison Park.  Liverpool stood in second place, two points behind Premiership leaders Newcastle United, but with a game in hand.  Everton meanwhile were in eighth position.  Robbie Fowler put Liverpool ahead on the half hour, however the late Gary Speed equalised for Everton with eight minutes to go to secure a 1-1 draw. 

By the following April when Liverpool came to Goodison Park, they sat in third place and three points behind Premiership leaders Man United.  Everton meanwhile had parted company with Joe Royle over the withholding of transfer funds.  Royle remained unbeaten against Liverpool in five Derby matches.  Long serving centre Half Dave Watson had taken over as Caretaker Manager until the end of the season.  The Toffees had by now sunk to twelfth place.  Jamie Redknapp gave Liverpool the lead on twenty six minutes, before Duncan Ferguson equalised on sixty five minutes.  With no further scoring the game ended in a 1-1 draw. 

Liverpool finished the season in fourth place and just missing out on being the first runners up to qualify for the Champions League to Newcastle United on goal difference (as too did Arsenal).   By the season’s close, Everton had slumped to fifteenth.  Over the summer, Everton found few takers for the vacant job of managing the Toffees and so turned to Howard Kendall to take charge of the club for a third time.  The first Merseyside Derby during Kendall’s third spell at Goodison Park came mid-October 1997.  Liverpool stood seventh in the table, seven points behind Premiership leaders Arsenal but with a game in hand.  Everton meanwhile, having won just two of their first nine games sat in eighteenth place.  Just ahead of half time, Everton took the lead with a Neil Ruddock own goal.  With fifteen minutes to go, a goal for Danny Cadamarteri secured a 2-0 Everton win.

The return fixture came in late February 1998.  Liverpool stood second in the Premiership behind table toppers Man United.  Everton on the other hand languished in sixteenth place, just five points clear of the relegation zone having played one game more than eighteenth place Crystal Palace.  Duncan Ferguson put Everton ahead just before the hour mark.  Ten minutes on however, Paul Ince equalised for Liverpool to secure a 1-1 draw.  The result left Liverpool seven points adrift of Man United on equal games.  The title however would not be heading to Old Trafford for the fourth year on the bounce, but to Highbury. 

Arsenal secured the title by beating Everton 4-0 at home at the start of May 1998.  The result left Everton in trouble, one point adrift of safety with one game left to play.  Everton secured their place in the top tier however with a 1-1 draw at home to Coventry, while Bolton Wanderers crashed to a 0-2 defeat at Chelsea to face the drop instead.  Liverpool meanwhile finished a respectable third place.  Over the summer of 1998, Howard Kendall again parted company with Everton.  Arriving in his place would be Walter Smith who arrived from Ibrox having overseen a large part of a near decade of domination with Rangers, after taking over from former Liverpool star Graeme Souness in 1991.

Over at Anfield meanwhile was the introduction of Gerard Houllier as joint manager alongside Roy Evans.  The first Merseyside Derby for both Houllier and Smith came in October 1998.  After eight games, Liverpool stood in fifth place and eight points behind unbeaten leaders Aston Villa.  Everton meanwhile languished in fourteenth having won just two of their first eight fixtures.  Neither side could quite give their season the boost it needed, as the two sides played out a 0-0 draw at Goodison Park.  One month later saw the appointment of Gerard Houllier in sole charge of the Liverpool side and the exit of Roy Evans, with whose exit saw the final dismantling of the ‘Boot Room’ system at Anfield which dated back nearly forty years with the introduction of Bill Shankly.

The return fixture back at Anfield took place in April 1999.  Liverpool had sunk to ninth position having won just one of their previous six games and as much as twenty four points behind leaders Man United, though having played two games less.  Everton meanwhile were sixteenth and just two points clear of the relegation zone.  Everton took the lead with a superb long range shot from Oliver Dacourt.  The enduring image of this game however would be Robbie Fowler’s goal celebration in front of the Everton fans after equalising from the penalty spot.  At the time, there had long been an urban myth that Robbie Fowler suffered from a substance addiction (and with the recent introduction of the internet, urban myths seemed to have gone into overdrive around this period – worth bearing in mind that ‘fake news’ isn’t a recent occurrence with the world wide web).

On converting the penalty, Fowler decided to get down on all fours and pretend to snort the touchline.  Fowler added a second six minutes later.  Patrick Berger extended Liverpool’s lead with eight minutes left to play and while Francis Jeffers pulled one back for Everton it was not enough to prevent a 3-2 victory for Liverpool and their first Merseyside Derby win for five years. 

Liverpool managed to finish the season in seventh position, while Everton put a seven point cushion between themselves and the relegation zone to finish fourteenth.  The final Merseyside Derby of the twentieth century occurred in late September 1999 at Anfield.  Everton stood in ninth place having won four of their eight games played to date.  Liverpool had won just three out of their first seven games, languishing in twelfth place.  A Kevin Campbell goal after four minutes was enough to secure a 1-0 away win for Everton.

The first Merseyside Derby of the new Millennium took place in late April 2000 at Goodison Park.  Liverpool stood in second place, though eleven points behind a Man United side running away with the title.  Everton meanwhile were ninth in the table.  The two sides played out a 0-0 draw, with an Everton goal controversially disallowed at full time.

The following October, the first Merseyside Derby of the 2000/01 took place at Anfield.  Liverpool were fourth in the table and trailing Man United by six points.  Everton meanwhile languished in fourteenth having won just three from ten games.  Nick Barmby had controversially transferred from Everton to Liverpool over the summer and had put Liverpool ahead after twelve minutes.  Five minutes later, Kevin Campbell equalised for Everton.  However, two second half goals for Emile Heskey and Patrick Berger gave Liverpool a 3-1 win.

The return fixture at Goodison Park came in mid-April 2001.  Liverpool were sixth in the table and twenty six points behind run away League leaders Man United.  Everton sat in sixteenth place with an eight point cushion from the relegation zone.  Liverpool had secured their first trophy of the Gerard Houllier era back in February with the League Cup and also had the FA Cup and UEFA Cup within their sights to set themselves up for a treble.  Emile Heskey gave Liverpool the lead, before a Duncan Ferguson equaliser.  Markus Babbel put Liverpool back in front near the hour mark, before a David Unsworth penalty pulled Everton level six minutes from time.  A winner from Gary McAllister in the final minute however gave Liverpool a 3-2 victory. 

Liverpool finished the season in third place, which secured them a place in the Champions League the following season.  It capped a good season for Liverpool who secured both the FA Cup and UEFA Cup and Liverpool’s second treble seventeen years after winning the League, League Cup and European Cup.  Everton meanwhile finished sixteenth.

 

September 2001 was of course an apocalyptic time for World with the occurrence the 9/11 attacks on New York City and Washington.  The Merseyside Derby followed four days later at Goodison Park.  Liverpool had won just one and lost two of their three games played to date.  Everton had won two of their four games played so far.  Kevin Campbell gave Everton the lead after just five minutes.  Seven minutes later however, Steven Gerrard equalised for Liverpool.  Further goals for Michael Owen and John Arne Riise meant a 3-1 victory for Liverpool.

The following February, Everton came to Anfield in sixteenth place and three points above the relegation zone.  Liverpool in contrast stood second and two points behind League leaders Man United.  Tomasz Radzinski gave Everton the lead seven minutes into the second half.  Nicolas Anelka however equalised with his first Premiership goal for Liverpool with eighteen minutes to go to secure a 1-1 draw.  This would be the final Merseyside Derby for Walter Smith, who parted company with Everton one month later, with Preston’s David Moyes taking over at the Goodison Park helm.

Liverpool managed to finish 2001/02 as runners up to Double winners Arsenal.  Everton meanwhile languished in fifteenth position, but with a seven point cushion from the drop zone.  In 2002/03, Everton headed to Anfield just three days before Christmas.  Liverpool stood in sixth place, with Everton one place above them in fifth.  This would be the first Merseyside Derby of the David Moyes era.  The game ended in a 0-0 draw.  The most noteworthy thing about this meeting had been a first Merseyside Derby for a seventeen year old Wayne Rooney who came on as sub for Tomasz Radzinski ten minutes into the second half 

The following April, when Liverpool came to Goodison Park they were one position below Everton in sixth.  Fifth place Everton had a one point cushion over their Merseyside neighbours.  A Michael Owen goal put Liverpool ahead on the half hour.  Thirteen minutes into the second half, a David Unsworth penalty levelled the scores.  Five minutes later, a goal for Danny Murphy secured a 2-1 victory for Liverpool, which allowed them to leap frog Everton by two clear points. 

By the season’s close, Liverpool finished in fifth, five points clear of Everton in seventh.  In 2003/04, the first Merseyside Derby of the season came just four games in, with Liverpool having so far failed to land a win, while Everton had just the one victory to their name.  The Reds kick started their season with an emphatic 3-0 away win at Goodison Park, with two goals for Michael Owen as well as Harry Kewell – a new signing from Leeds United on the scoresheet. 

The return fixture came at the end of January 2004.  Liverpool were in fifth place and nineteen points behind Premiership leaders Arsenal.  Everton meanwhile stood in fourteenth place and four points from the drop zone.  A goal for Lee Carsley after sixty eight minutes gave Everton a 1-0 victory.  The two sides played out a 0-0 draw.  It was to be the final Merseyside Derby during the Gerard Houllier era.  Liverpool finished the season in fourth place to reclaim a spot within the Champions League.  They were however thirty points behind unbeaten Champions Arsena, which led to Houllier being relieved of his duties and Spaniard Rafa Benitez taking over at Anfield.  Everton meanwhile after four straight league defeats in their final quartet of fixtures had finished in seventeenth place, though six points from the drop.

By the end of that calendar year, just two weeks before Christmas, Liverpool came to Goodison Park for the 2004/05 season.  Despite selling young Wayne Rooney to Man United over the summer, Everton were riding high in third place and just six points off of Premiership leaders Chelsea. Liverpool meanwhile sat in seventh place.  A goal for Lee Carsley gave Everton a 1-0 win.

By the March 2005, Everton stood in fourth place and with a seven point cushion over Liverpool in sixth.  Goals for Steven Gerrard and Luis Garcia put Liverpool two up by half time.  Tim Cahill pulled one back for Everton eight minutes from time, but could not prevent a 2-1 victory for Liverpool.

Everton finished the season one place ahead of Liverpool in fourth and a three point cushion over their neighbours.  Liverpool however would secure their fifth European title with a penalty shoot-out victory over AC Milan.  That meant that both sides would compete within the Champions League for the 2005/06 season, though Everton had to make do with the Qualifying phase and unfortunately defeat rubbed them of a chance to play within the group phase.  The reigning European Champions however come to Goodison Park in the interim between Christmas and New Year in 2005.  At the time, Liverpool were third in the table, though fifteen points off of League leaders Chelsea.  Everton meanwhile had won just five of their eighteen league games played and were languishing in sixteenth place. 

Goals for Peter Crouch and Steven Gerrard put Liverpool two up.  James Beattie pulled one back for Everton three minutes before Half time.  Two minutes into the second half however, Djibril Cisse added another to secure a 3-1 win.

The return fixture came three months later at the end of March 2006.  Two yellow cards for Steve Gerrard meant his sending off after seventeen minutes (there too would be a sending off for Everton’s Andy Van Der Meyde which later evened up the sides).  A Phil Neville own goal gave Liverpool the lead, followed by Luis Garcia.  Tim Cahill pulled one back on the hour mark, however a third from Harry Kewell six minutes from time meant a 3-1 victory for the Reds.  Liverpool remained in third place, while Everton were ninth.

The season ended with Liverpool in third place, while Everton remained in eleventh.  In 2006/07, Liverpool came to Goodison Park in early September just four games into the season.  Goals for Tim Cahill and two for Andrew Johnson meant a comprehensive 3-0 win for Everton. 

The return fixture at Anfield came at the start of February.  Liverpool stood in third place, but nineteen points behind Premiership leaders Man United.  Everton meanwhile were sixth.  The two sides played out a 0-0 draw.  Liverpool and Everton remained third and sixth respectively at the end of 2006/07.  The Reds also were runners up in the Champions League Finals to AC Milan.  In 2007/08, Liverpool’s visit to Goodison Park came in Late October.  After eight games, Liverpool were fourth, and six points behind Premiership leaders Arsenal.  Everton meanwhile sat in tenth having won just four from nine games.  Everton took the lead with a Sami Hyypia own goal.  Two penalties from Dirk Kuyt however meant Liverpool took all three points with a 2-1 victory.

The return fixture at Anfield came in the last week of March 2008.  Liverpool were in fourth place, while Everton were chasing the Champions League spot five points behind in fifth.  A goal for Fernando Torres after seven minutes increased Liverpool’s gap over their neighbours with a 1-0 win.  By May, fourth placed Liverpool secured the Champions League spot with a nine point gap over Everton in fifth.

In 2008/09, Liverpool came to Goodison at the end of September.  Liverpool won three of their first five games and were a point behind Premiership leaders Arsenal.  Everton had won just two of their first five and sat in ninth.  Two goals for Fernando Torres around the hour mark gave Liverpool the points with a 2-0 win.

The following week, the two sides were drawn against each other in the fourth round of the FA Cup at Anfield.  A Steven Gerrard goal nine minutes into the second half cancelled out an early goal by Joleon Lescott for a 1-1 draw.  A week and a half later came the replay at Goodison Park.  The game was shown live on ITV and enormous upset was caused as a random commercial break occurred during play.  During the commercial break Dan Gosling scored with two minutes left of extra time to play, spearing a penalty shoot-out as Everton eliminated Liverpool with a 1-0 victory.

Liverpool missed out on the title in 2008/09 after finishing four points behind Man United in second.  Meanwhile Everton missed out on a Champions League spot after finishing nine points behind fourth placed Arsenal in fifth.  The last meeting between the two sides during the noughties came at Goodison Park in late November 2009.  Liverpool slumped to seventh place, while Everton sat in sixteenth.  Liverpool took the lead after twelve minutes with an own goal from Joseph Yobo.  A Dirk Kuyt goal ten minutes from time wrapped up a 2-0 win.  The first Merseyside Derby of the 2010s came the following February.  Liverpool had climbed to fifth place and one point behind Spurs for a Champions League qualification spot.  Everton meanwhile stood in ninth place.  A goal for Dirk Kuyt ten minutes into the second half gave Liverpool a 1-0 win.

The 2009/10 season ended with Liverpool finishing seventh and Everton two points behind in eighth place.  As a result of Liverpool’s relatively low finish, the Reds parted company with Rafa Benitez and appointed Roy Hodgson in his place.  The one and only Merseyside Derby during the Roy Hodgson era came in mid-October 2010.  After seven games, both Merseyside clubs had won just one game each.  Everton stood in seventeenth place, ahead of Liverpool in eighteenth by virtue of goal difference.  Goals for Tim Cahill and Mikel Arteta meant a 2-0 victory for Everton (to date their last Merseyside Derby win). 

By January 2011, Liverpool had slumped to twelfth having only seven of their twenty games played to date, which meant that Roy Hodgson was heading for the Anfield exit.  Kenny Dalglish stepped in for the Merseyside Derby eight days later.  Liverpool took the lead on the half hour with a goal from Raul Meireles.  Within the first seven minutes, two goals for Everton from Sylvain Distin and Jermaine Beckford put Everton ahead.  A goal from Dirk Kuyt with twenty two minutes left to play earned Liverpool a 2-2 draw.

Liverpool ended 2010/11 in sixth place, while Everton were four points behind in seventh.  In 2011/12, the first Merseyside Derby of the season occurred at the start of October.  After six games, Liverpool were fifth, while Everton stood eleventh in the table.  In the final twenty minutes, goals for Andy Carroll and Luis Suarez meant a 2-0 win for Liverpool.  The following March when Everton came to Anfield, Liverpool stood in seventh place while Everton were two points behind in ninth place.  A Steven Gerrard hat-trick gave Liverpool a 3-0 victory.

One month later, the two sides met again at Wembley in the FA Cup Semi Final.  Nikica Jelavic gave Everton the lead on twenty four minutes, however second half goals for Luis Suarez and Andy Carroll gave Liverpool a 2-1 victory to set them up for an FA Cup Final with Chelsea in the hope of adding to the League Cup earlier in the season.

Liverpool lost to Chelsea in the final and finished eighth, while Everton finished four points clear of their neighbours in seventh place.  Over the summer, Liverpool replaced Kenny Dalglish with Swansea’s Brendan Rodgers.  The first Merseyside Derby of the Brendan Rodgers era came at the end of October 2012.  After eight games, Everton were fifth while Liverpool with just two victories stood thirteenth.  A Leighton Baines own goal gave Liverpool the lead and a goal from Luis Suarez doubled Liverpool’s lead.  Goals from Leon Osman and Steven Naismith however earned Everton a 2-2 draw.

Everton’s visit to Anfield that season came in May.  With three games left to play, Everton were six points off of a Champions League spot in sixth.  Liverpool were five points behind them in seventh place.  The two sides played out a 0-0 draw.  Three days later, Man United manager of twenty six years – Alex Ferguson – announced his retirement from the game.  Immediately tipped for the hot seat was Everton boss David Moyes who was announced as United’s new manager a day later.  Everton finished the season in sixth place and one place above Liverpool who were two points behind in seventh place.  Appointed in his place had been Wigan Athletic boss Roberto Martinez. 

The first Merseyside Derby of the Martinez era came in late November 2013.  After eleven games, Everton stood on equal points with their new boss David Moyes, but below them by goal difference in sixth place.  Liverpool meanwhile were second in the table and two points behind Premiership leaders Arsenal.  Philippe Coutinho gave Liverpool the lead on five minutes, before a Kevin Mirallas equaliser three minutes later for the Toffees.  Luis Suarez put Liverpool back in front on nineteen minutes, before two Romelu Lukaku goals put Everton ahead.  A last minute equaliser from Daniel Sturridge however earned Liverpool a 3-3 draw.

The return fixture at Anfield came in late January 2014.  Liverpool were fourth in the table and eight points behind leaders Arsenal.  Everton meanwhile were sixth and one point behind their neighbours.  Goals for Steven Gerrard, Luis Suarez and two for Daniel Sturridge meant a 4-0 victory for Liverpool.  The Reds finished the 2013/14 season two points off of title winners Man City in second place.  Everton meanwhile finished fifth with eight points more than their old boss David Moyes at Man United in seventh place.

The return fixture came in early February 2015 at Goodison Park, by which point Liverpool stood in seventh place, while Everton were twelfth.  The two sides played out a 0-0 draw.  Liverpool finished the season in sixth place, while Everton languished in eleventh place. 

In 2015/16, Liverpool came to Goodison Park in early October, with boss Brendan Rodgers under fire.  Liverpool stood in tenth place after seven games, while Everton were a point above them in seventh.  Danny Ings gave Liverpool the lead on forty one minutes.  Romelu Lukaku however equalised for Everton on the stroke of half time.  With no further scoring the game finished in a 1-1 draw (the fourth drawn Merseyside Derby on the bounce).  It was a result that was not enough to save Brendan Rodgers who was fired after the final whistle, with Thierry Henry’s memorable response when it was announced on Sky Sports.

Liverpool appointed former Dortmund manager Jurgen Klopp in replacement and his forst Merseyside Derby came in late April 2016.  Liverpool stood in eighth place, while Everton were eleventh in the table.  Goals for Divock Origi, Mamadou Sakho, Daniel Sturridge and Philippe Coutinho gave Liverpool a 4-0 victory. 

The 2015/16 season ended with Liverpool finishing twenty one points behind Champions Leicester City in eighth place, while Everton remained eleventh which saw Roberto Martinez part company with Everton over the summer and Dutchman Ronald Koeman appointed in his place.  Koeman’s first Merseyside Derby came last December at Goodison Park, six days before Christmas.  Liverpool stood third, while Everton were ninth.  In time added on, Sadio Mané gave Liverpool a 1-0 victory.  The return fixture on the first day of April 2017 saw a 3-1 victory for Liverpool

Published: 10th December 2017

In 2014/15, Everton came to Anfield at the end of September.  After five games, Liverpool had managed just two wins and were languishing in eleventh place.  Everton with just one win since the start of the season were three places below in fourteenth.  Steven Gerrard gave Liverpool the lead on sixty five minutes.  A last minute goal from Phil Jagielka however earned Everton a 1-1 draw.

By December 2017, Everton had replaced Ronald Koeman after a poor start to the 2017/18 season with Sam Allardyce.  The first Merseyside Derby of the Allardyce era ended in a 1-1 draw.